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Crusader Kings III

Started by Syt, October 19, 2019, 04:02:55 AM

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jimmy olsen

Don't have the new DLC, but have been enjoying the new features that were released to everyone like languages. I've never played as Alfred before, not even in CK2.

Turned out not too bad.

Here's a map of the British isles about a year before the death of Alfred



His lecherous intrigue focused son was easily elected king, but his 10 year old son is not getting votes because he's a child and rowdy which is considered evil.  :rolleyes:   

He's humble though and I predict good things for him. I gave him two counties and a barony due to domain limits and I betrothed him to my 13 year old niece (so, his first cousin I guess) because she's my strongest vassal (Duchess of Mercia). I was shocked to see him intervene in a liberty war against her that she was losing, and when I investigated it turned out that they were friends. :wub:

They're well on the way to winning that war now.
It is far better for the truth to tear my flesh to pieces, then for my soul to wander through darkness in eternal damnation.

Jet: So what kind of woman is she? What's Julia like?
Faye: Ordinary. The kind of beautiful, dangerous ordinary that you just can't leave alone.
Jet: I see.
Faye: Like an angel from the underworld. Or a devil from Paradise.
--------------------------------------------
1 Karma Chameleon point

jimmy olsen

I haven't got the DLC, but there is a whole load of new free content that I'm loving.

I'm pretty sure I have a handle on minor positions, learning languages, the inventory and artifacts.

As for the traditions, they seem wildly expensive. Like you need to have a king reign for 30 years and save up their prestige for them expensive. Is it just me?

As an Anglo-Saxon king, what are good traditions that would go well with what I already have or be a realistic/historical addition?

My boy comes of age
It is far better for the truth to tear my flesh to pieces, then for my soul to wander through darkness in eternal damnation.

Jet: So what kind of woman is she? What's Julia like?
Faye: Ordinary. The kind of beautiful, dangerous ordinary that you just can't leave alone.
Jet: I see.
Faye: Like an angel from the underworld. Or a devil from Paradise.
--------------------------------------------
1 Karma Chameleon point

jimmy olsen

Anglo-Saxons are Burecratic

Their traditions are
City Keepers
Hirds
The Witenagemot

I can see Beauracratic, Hirds and The Witenagemot...but the Anglo-Saxons hardly had any cities of note. Seems an odd choice by the developers.  :hmm:
It is far better for the truth to tear my flesh to pieces, then for my soul to wander through darkness in eternal damnation.

Jet: So what kind of woman is she? What's Julia like?
Faye: Ordinary. The kind of beautiful, dangerous ordinary that you just can't leave alone.
Jet: I see.
Faye: Like an angel from the underworld. Or a devil from Paradise.
--------------------------------------------
1 Karma Chameleon point

crazy canuck

Think of the Burhs created by Alfred, that became cities.  As for the Anglo Saxons as a group, you may have heard of London.  Yes it was founded before them.  But they built it back up so that by the the time of the conquest it was a city. 

I want you to panic

https://www.theguardian.com/science/video/2019/jan/25/i-want-you-to-panic-16-year-old-greta-thunberg-issues-climate-warning-at-davos-video

"Woke" is now almost exclusively used by those who seek to deride it, those who chafe at the activism from which it sprang. Opponents to the idea are seeking to render it toxic. They use it to stand in for change itself, for evolution, for an accurate assessment of history and society that makes them uncomfortable and deflates their hagiographic view of American history.

The Minsky Moment

Urban life in Anglo Saxon England was pretty insignificant pre-Alfred, but towns did grow quite a bit in the 10th and 11th centuries, pre-conquest.
The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists.
--Joan Robinson

jimmy olsen

Quote from: The Minsky Moment on May 17, 2022, 03:51:23 PMUrban life in Anglo Saxon England was pretty insignificant pre-Alfred, but towns did grow quite a bit in the 10th and 11th centuries, pre-conquest.
Yeah, but they were towns. They weren't exactly Paris or Milan.
It is far better for the truth to tear my flesh to pieces, then for my soul to wander through darkness in eternal damnation.

Jet: So what kind of woman is she? What's Julia like?
Faye: Ordinary. The kind of beautiful, dangerous ordinary that you just can't leave alone.
Jet: I see.
Faye: Like an angel from the underworld. Or a devil from Paradise.
--------------------------------------------
1 Karma Chameleon point

The Minsky Moment

Quote from: jimmy olsen on May 17, 2022, 07:38:56 PM
Quote from: The Minsky Moment on May 17, 2022, 03:51:23 PMUrban life in Anglo Saxon England was pretty insignificant pre-Alfred, but towns did grow quite a bit in the 10th and 11th centuries, pre-conquest.
Yeah, but they were towns. They weren't exactly Paris or Milan.

Paris in the 10th century wasn't exactly Paris either, it's all relative.
The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists.
--Joan Robinson

crazy canuck

Quote from: jimmy olsen on May 17, 2022, 07:38:56 PM
Quote from: The Minsky Moment on May 17, 2022, 03:51:23 PMUrban life in Anglo Saxon England was pretty insignificant pre-Alfred, but towns did grow quite a bit in the 10th and 11th centuries, pre-conquest.
Yeah, but they were towns. They weren't exactly Paris or Milan.

Actually yes they were. You are thinking about cities in a later time period.
I want you to panic

https://www.theguardian.com/science/video/2019/jan/25/i-want-you-to-panic-16-year-old-greta-thunberg-issues-climate-warning-at-davos-video

"Woke" is now almost exclusively used by those who seek to deride it, those who chafe at the activism from which it sprang. Opponents to the idea are seeking to render it toxic. They use it to stand in for change itself, for evolution, for an accurate assessment of history and society that makes them uncomfortable and deflates their hagiographic view of American history.

jimmy olsen

I just managed to get 76 counties in Britain, but before I could save the money to declare myself Emperor, I died.  :rolleyes:

I just do not get succession at all anymore. Is this working as designed or is it bugged? Long time CK2 vet and it just doesn't look right.

I had a ton of sons, confederate partition and my chosen heir (Anglo-Saxon Elective) got nearly everything. He was elected King of England of course, the game created the Kingdom of Ireland and gave it to him, along with all of my duchies and counties. Does the game not count elective titles when doing this? Why didn't they give Ireland to another son? The game also created the Kingdom of Wales and gave it to my oldest son, an insane peg leg Plobian (is this a proto Polish culture?) duke. Why didn't any of my other sons get titles?

I'm actually allied with the new King of Wales, and I'm young enough, that if I war hard enough in Alba and Ireland and pick the right skills, I should be able to establish the Empire and vassalize him peacefully.
It is far better for the truth to tear my flesh to pieces, then for my soul to wander through darkness in eternal damnation.

Jet: So what kind of woman is she? What's Julia like?
Faye: Ordinary. The kind of beautiful, dangerous ordinary that you just can't leave alone.
Jet: I see.
Faye: Like an angel from the underworld. Or a devil from Paradise.
--------------------------------------------
1 Karma Chameleon point

Richard Hakluyt

Quote from: jimmy olsen on May 17, 2022, 05:52:21 AMAnglo-Saxons are Burecratic

Their traditions are
City Keepers
Hirds
The Witenagemot

I can see Beauracratic, Hirds and The Witenagemot...but the Anglo-Saxons hardly had any cities of note. Seems an odd choice by the developers.  :hmm:

Perhaps the reasoning is that if Anglo-Saxon England had maintained its independence then the burhs would have developed further and the country have been more urbanised in the high middle ages?


The Minsky Moment

Quote from: Richard Hakluyt on May 27, 2022, 02:28:43 AM
Quote from: jimmy olsen on May 17, 2022, 05:52:21 AMAnglo-Saxons are Burecratic

Their traditions are
City Keepers
Hirds
The Witenagemot

I can see Beauracratic, Hirds and The Witenagemot...but the Anglo-Saxons hardly had any cities of note. Seems an odd choice by the developers.  :hmm:

Perhaps the reasoning is that if Anglo-Saxon England had maintained its independence then the burhs would have developed further and the country have been more urbanised in the high middle ages?

There is some logic to that - the late Anglo-Saxon monarchy did seem to be interesed in promoting commercial activity, whereas the Norman takeover focused elite efforts on rural castle building to facilitate control of the countryside.  Otherwise it's hard to see why the Anglo-Saxons in particular would be seen as urban specialists.
The purpose of studying economics is not to acquire a set of ready-made answers to economic questions, but to learn how to avoid being deceived by economists.
--Joan Robinson

jimmy olsen

If I'm emperor of Britania, but not King of England, I can't vote for who's going to be King of England, despite all my holdings being in southern England. This is dumb.

We'll, that King will almost certainly rebel, so that will solve the problem one way or the other.
It is far better for the truth to tear my flesh to pieces, then for my soul to wander through darkness in eternal damnation.

Jet: So what kind of woman is she? What's Julia like?
Faye: Ordinary. The kind of beautiful, dangerous ordinary that you just can't leave alone.
Jet: I see.
Faye: Like an angel from the underworld. Or a devil from Paradise.
--------------------------------------------
1 Karma Chameleon point